July 12: Rebekah- Genesis 25:19-35

This summer, we are looking to the women of the Bible for encouragement, advice, and examples of living life full with God.  In July and August, we’re reading the stories of Eve, Sarah, Hagar, Rebekah, Leah, Rachel, Miriam, Zipporah, Deborah, Hannah, Abigail, Proverbs 31 woman, Gomer, Elizabeth, all the Marys, Martha, woman at the well, bleeding woman, adulterous woman, Canaanite woman, Lydia, Eunice, Priscilla, and the Titus 2 woman.  Join our study by reading today’s scripture below and journaling about it using SOAP (click on the “What’s SOAP?” link above to learn more). An example SOAP from our team is below today’s Bible reading. Comments are always welcome on our website for questions, discussion, and accountability.

Rebekah – Genesis 25:19-35

Jacob and Esau

19 This is the account of the family line of Abraham’s son Isaac.
Abraham became the father of Isaac, 20 and Isaac was forty years old when he married Rebekah daughter of Bethuel the Aramean from Paddan Aram and sister of Laban the Aramean.
21 Isaac prayed to the Lord on behalf of his wife, because she was childless. The Lord answered his prayer, and his wife Rebekah became pregnant. 22 The babies jostled each other within her, and she said, “Why is this happening to me?” So she went to inquire of the Lord.
23 The Lord said to her,
“Two nations are in your womb,
    and two peoples from within you will be separated;
one people will be stronger than the other,
    and the older will serve the younger.”
24 When the time came for her to give birth, there were twin boys in her womb. 25 The first to come out was red, and his whole body was like a hairy garment; so they named him Esau. 26 After this, his brother came out, with his hand grasping Esau’s heel; so he was named Jacob. Isaac was sixty years old when Rebekah gave birth to them.
27 The boys grew up, and Esau became a skillful hunter, a man of the open country, while Jacob was content to stay at home among the tents. 28 Isaac, who had a taste for wild game, loved Esau, but Rebekah loved Jacob.
29 Once when Jacob was cooking some stew, Esau came in from the open country, famished. 30 He said to Jacob, “Quick, let me have some of that red stew! I’m famished!” (That is why he was also called Edom.)
31 Jacob replied, “First sell me your birthright.”
32 “Look, I am about to die,” Esau said. “What good is the birthright to me?”
33 But Jacob said, “Swear to me first.” So he swore an oath to him, selling his birthright to Jacob.
34 Then Jacob gave Esau some bread and some lentil stew. He ate and drank, and then got up and left.
So Esau despised his birthright.

SOAP Note

Pleading With God | Rebecca Hoyt

Scripture

Genesis 25:21-22

Observation

Just like his mother was barren, Jacob’s wife is barren. They tried for 20 years to have children. But unlike his parents, he went to  God and pleaded with Him instead of trying to do it on their own. God answered their prayer. When the next struggle came and Rebekah was wondering why did her children struggle within her, she went straight to God.

Application

So many times when there is a struggle in my life, I try and do it on my own until it gets really bad; then I remember to pray, and I wonder each time why did it take me so long to come to God with it. In the recent year I’m getting better about going straight to God and letting Him handle things but I still have a ways to go.

Prayer

Dear Lord, I am so thankful for each new day You give to me and my family. During the summer, I am thankful for no homework and good attitudes. In the midst of big changes for my family, thank You for always being with us. Please continue to guide us on health issues and find solutions.

The Discover One Thing main website follows a reading plan that goes through the entire Bible in one year. Click HERE to check out today’s Discover One Thing post.

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Posted on July 12, 2017, in Uncategorized and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

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